Houston Havens

Guest Post with Author @BettyBolte – Traces

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Character Revealed through Cars

 

Do you judge a person by what they drive? I believe the kind of vehicle we purchase (not rent or borrow) says a great deal about a person.

For example, my first husband drove a flashy car, though it wasn’t a high performance kind of vehicle. It looked nice but there wasn’t much to it. No room to carry bulky items or even other passengers. The type of car suited to an individual, not a family. Turns out, he was all flash, too. When it came to substance, he had little to offer.

My second and current husband drove a very sensible Toyota Corolla. It got great gas mileage and was easy to maintain. Two aspects he very much appreciated since he’s somewhat of a spendthrift. But that little car had heart and guts and fearlessly braved deep snow when he drove to my birthday party in 22 inches of the white stuff. See, the car did reflect his personality as well.

Nowadays, I drive a Toyota Sienna minivan and I love it! It’s practical and roomy and sporty all rolled into one vehicle. It has a moon roof, Bluetooth, and powered doors and rear lift gate. We originally purchased it to make it easier to transport my father and his walker, then his wheelchair. It also has four captain’s chairs, so the second row passengers can also recline their individual seats on long trips, of which we’ve taken many. (This isn’t a sales pitch, by the way, just explaining why I love my van!) I imagine folks think I’m a soccer mom or something, which couldn’t be farther from the truth at this point in my life. Both my kids are adults! Many times sports cars zip past me, but I’m also known to pass them as well.

In Traces (Ghosts of Roseville Book 1), Meredith drives a bright yellow Camaro. Why did I give her this car? Because it’s bold and confident and has the image of success. It’s roomy enough to handle passengers but sleek enough to be fun to drive. These characteristics reflect on her personality and achievements as an architect.

Likewise, Max drives a dark green F-150 pickup truck. He’s sensible and capable and willing to help when called upon. Thus he needs a way to move friends and family in and out of apartments, or more importantly replace the screened door after he breaks in to rescue Meredith even though she wasn’t in any real danger. But he didn’t know that at the time. In fact, Meredith finally agrees to go on a date with Max, and they naturally take his truck.

 

            Max took one of her hands, wrapped his strong fingers around hers, and lifted her fingers to his kiss. “I’m glad you’re here. Shall we go eat?”

            She nodded, mesmerized by his gallant act. He pushed open the door and stepped out into the cooler spring air. He paused on the sidewalk. “Ready? I’m parked over there.”

            She followed the motion of his free hand and saw his pickup, obviously recently washed and waxed, gleaming in the parking lot lights. She nodded, afraid if she spoke, she’d ask him to take her home with him instead of to a restaurant. She was hungry, all right, but not for food. Her body sang from his kiss, her emotions abuzz inside. Before she knew it, she was ensconced in the passenger seat of the truck, seat belt in place, as he shut the door and made his way to slide into the driver’s seat. He grinned at her as he reached to secure his own belt. After lowering the windows to allow the cooler air into the stuffy interior, he laid a hand on hers and squeezed. …

            “I’m glad you agreed to see me after the concert, Meredith.” He kissed her lightly. “I hope you’ll let me get to know you better.”

            “Paulette told me this afternoon that it’s time for me to try to move on from the past, to start looking to the future.” She searched his eyes, looking for understanding. “I’m trying, in my own way.”

            “Let me help.” He traced her jaw with a finger, pulling her chin around so he could lift it to his kiss. He leaned in and pressed his lips to hers for a long, lingering moment. “It’ll be my pleasure, my lady.”

            The close confines of the cab lent a sense of security to the entire experience. Meredith allowed herself to respond, even closed her eyes to enjoy the sensation of his lips, and then his tongue playing with the tip of her own. A low moan began at the base of her throat and worked its way up and out into the night. She’d missed this more than she’d ever admitted to herself. The interplay between a man and a woman. If bones really could melt, then hers were doing so. Max’s grip on her chin increased, and the kiss deepened.

            “Hey!”

            Meredith jerked back at the deep voice yelling through the darkened window. Echoes of a night years before reverberated in her memory. A yell. A demand. A gunshot. Panic swelled in her chest. Not again. The silhouette of a man appeared at the open window, the parking lights framing his outline and casting his face and features into deep shadow. A glint of metal shone in his hand. Terror, sharp and clear and white-hot, lanced through Meredith. A scream tore from her throat as the man raised his hand, metal poking closer to the open window. Max turned to the stranger to say something, but the metal flashed in the light as the stranger raised his hand. Spots formed before her eyes as another scream seared her throat, and then the night descended upon her.

 

Poor Max just can’t catch a break! He spent all that time cleaning and shining his truck and then the date goes south. But he’s ready, nonetheless, to help when and where needed.

What do you think? What does your vehicle say about you?

If you’d like to be informed of breaking news and contest winners, please subscribe to my newsletter at www.bettybolte.com/newsletter.htm. As a thank you, each quarter I’ll draw one name at random to win a gift, too. I promise to not overload your inbox, but only send out a broadside when there is news worth sharing. The next drawing is in just a few days, on June 1, so sign up today!

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Traces by Betty Bolté

Author: Betty Bolté

Publisher: Liquid Silver Books

Series: Ghosts of Roseville

Book #: 1

Genre: Contemporary, Paranormal, Ghosts, Spirits, Hauntings, Suspense

Heat Level: 1

Words: 76,000

Content Notes: Sweet

Publication Date: 4/28/2014

ISBN: 978-1-62210-101-6

Price: $5.99

Buy Links

LSBooks: http://bit.ly/1fp2brP

Amazon: http://amzn.to/1ivVTpS

Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/1j7WOwq

Kobo: http://bit.ly/1tUDIic

iBookstore: http://bit.ly/1hIrDDb

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Mini-Blurb

Architect Meredith Reed aims to demolish her family plantation to bury her grief. But her conniving sister, a hunky lawyer, and a spectral Lady all have other ideas. Can she carry out her plan before they teach her the lessons of family and love she so desperately needs?

 

blurb

Meredith Reed, a forty-year-old architect turned demolition expert, desperately searches for the means to bury her grief. When she inherits her family’s historic plantation home in Tennessee, she decides to start anew by razing the antebellum house and replacing it with a memorial garden.  A plan met with outrage from her family and her grandmother’s estate lawyer.

James Maximillian “Max” Chandler needs two things to complete his life plan: become a senior partner and find his soul mate. He’s been promised a promotion once his proposed legislation to protect all of the county’s historic properties is approved. The wife part he finds more challenging, having never met the right woman in all of his forty-six years. If only the talented and attractive Meredith weren’t so aloof toward him and didn’t want to destroy the very property he’s grown to cherish.

Meanwhile, Meredith’s estranged sister moves in and refuses to leave. The memories of their childhood spent there causes turmoil between them. And while Meredith struggles to reconcile her past and her future, she learns a lesson from the spectral Lady in Blue that may save both her family and the family home from destruction.

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authorbio

 

Betty Bolté writes both historical and contemporary stories that feature strong, loving women and brave,Betty Bolte-July 2013 compassionate men. No matter whether the stories are set in the past or the present, she loves to include a touch of the paranormal. Traces is a contemporary romantic women’s fiction novel set in a haunted plantation home in Tennessee, scheduled for release on April 28, 2014. Hometown Heroines: True Stories of Bravery, Daring, and Adventure (2012) is a collection of short historical fiction based on the real-life achievements of 19 American girls in the 19th century, each with a landmark in the United States of America. The first edition won Honorable Mention in the 2003 Writer’s Digest International Self-Published Book Awards and 2000 Writer’s Digest Writing Competition, while the 2012 edition won the 2014 Literary Classics Seal of Approval.. She’s the author of several nonfiction books and currently marketing a romantic historical fiction trilogy.

Social Media Links

Website: www.bettybolte.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/AuthorBettyBolte

Twitter: @BettyBolte

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/bettybolte

Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/bettybolte9

Amazon: www.amazon.com/author/bettybolte

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Thank you Betty for being here today

 

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Author: houstonhavens

Houston Havens is an international and national Best Seller of Romance from erotic to main steam. Reviewers say her books are 5 star quality and should be the next block buster movie of the year!

2 thoughts on “Guest Post with Author @BettyBolte – Traces

  1. Betty!

    I’m so happy to have you here today … I have to laugh at the car remark … but so true!

    Traces sounds interesting! Can’t wait to read it.

    Houston

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